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Mother’s Day flower show

Come celebrate spring and your mom with the Klamath National Forest and California Native Plant Society’s annual wildflower show On Sunday, May 14.
Nearly 300 species of fresh wildflowers, native plants and ‘non-native’ weeds will be on exhibit at the Siskiyou Golden Fairgrounds, in the Flower Building, at 1712 Fairlane Road, Yreka. The exhibit, sponsored as a partnership by the Klamath National Forest and the Shasta Chapter of the California Native Plant Society, will display flowers, shrubs, trees, mosses, ferns, lichens, and weeds, many of which are found only in the Klamath region. These plants lend our area an international reputation for its diverse and unique blend of plants. Read more...

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History of Mothers Day and Bouquets

OPENPRESS, May 4, 2006

Mother’s Day was not an official holiday in the United States until 1914. Modern Americans can thank the perseverance and determination of a woman named Anna Jarvis who, deeply devoted to her own mother, helped to make Mother’s Day an official U.S. holiday.

Jarvis’s mother, Anna Maria Reeves Jarvis, was an activist during the Civil War and lost 8 of her 12 children before they reached adulthood. When she died in 1905, Anna (daughter) was distraught and vowed to devote her life to honoring her mother. Her devotion led her to strive to appoint an official U.S. holiday to recognize mothers. Though Mother’s Day had been celebrated informally for many years, Jarvis wrote many important figures (including U.S. congressmen and prosperous businessmen), imploring them to back Mother’s Day as an official holiday.

Anna’s efforts finally paid off. In 1910, the governor of West Virginia declared Mother's Day a state holiday on the second Sunday in May. The following year, every other state followed suit. By 1914, President Woodrow Wilson signed a bill declaring Mother’s Day a Federal Holiday.

At first, celebrations of Mother's Day were relatively private, where children would accompany their mothers to the churches where their baptisms were held. Gradually though, Mother's Day has flourished into a significant and memorable occasion where many people express their love for their mothers through thoughtful gifts and quality time with family.

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1800flowers.com coupon: 15% off $30

1800flowers.com slices 15% off a purchase of $30 or more via coupon code "CLEVERMOM". It's the best percent-off coupon we've seen from 1800flowers.com since February. Coupon ends December 31. Other 1800flowers.com coupons are also available.

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Exciting New Lilacs Developed

After years of hybridizing, testing and evaluation, two new lilac (Syringa) cultivars - Old Glory and Declaration were released to the ornamental nursery industry by the Arboretum’s shrub breeding program.
Old Glory has abundant fragrant bluish-purple flowers, rounded growth habitat and leaves that have improved disease tolerance. Declaration stands out for its fragrant striking reddish-purple flowers in floral clusters up to 30 cm (15 inches) long that occur along the branches.
The Arboretum is the leading institution in the United States conducting long-term hybridization, testing and evaluating of trees and shrubs. Over 650 named cultivars have been released by the Arboretum to the ornamental nursery and floral industries. Learn more about these lilac varieties...

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What To Do With Withered, Finished Hardy Spring Bulbs?

Late spring is when the foliage of spring-blooming daffodils, tulips, hyacinths and iris reticulata dies down. It is time to dig, divide and store or replant the bulbs for next year's bloom. Here's how, according to Gail Gredler, horticulturist with the Oregon State University Extension Service.
After the leaves turn yellow, cut and destroy the stems and foliage of the plants. Dead foliage left on the ground may carry disease to new growth the next year. Fertilize the bulbs you plan to leave in the ground with a 5-10-10 fertilizer and some bonemeal for an extra source of phosphorus. If your flowering bulbs have become too crowded or have ceased blooming each year, you may want to dig them up, separate them and replant them farther apart in newly fertilized soil. Replanting or respacing can be done now, but is best done in the late summer or early fall.
If you decide to dig spring bulbs up and store them over the summer until fall, dry them for a day, then keep them in a cool, dry place. Temperatures higher than 70 degrees will damage the tiny flower inside. Dig up your bulb beds when the soil is fairly dry to avoid unnecessary soil compaction. Take care to dig deeply and far away enough from the bulbs to prevent slicing them with the shovel. Remove bulbs and shake off clinging soil. Discard soft, rotten or diseased bulbs.
To replant the bulbs now or in the fall, spade the beds eight to 12 inches deep. Remove large stones and break apart clumps of hard soil. Use a small handful of well-balanced fertilizer per cluster of bulbs. Place a one- to two-inch layer of organic matter at the bottom of the planting space. Thoroughly mix the fertilizer, including two tablespoons of bonemeal per bulb, and organic matter with the soil. Add a thin layer of unfertilized soil. Place bulbs on top and cover them with more unfertilized soil. Soak the planted area to settle the bulbs.
As a general rule of thumb, plant bulbs to a depth of two and one-half to three times the diameter of the bulb. Tulips should be about six inches deep; crocus, two inches; daffodils, seven inches; grape hyacinths and irises, three inches and hyacinths, four inches. It is important not to plant bulbs too shallowly because this will encourage frost heaving in some regions. Read more...

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Contain Your Garden!!

Container gardening is more popular than ever. According to research conducted by Dynamic Design, the average household today has 4.2 planters. And why not? Ideal for urban or rural lifestyles, container gardening offers more mobility and flexibility than traditional gardening. It can provide year-round satisfaction as well as the opportunity to bring the outdoors inside.
Once thought to be the ideal alternative for apartment dwellers and people with small yards, container gardening is today enjoyed by people of all ages, lifestyles and gardening abilities. Here are a few tips to ensure a successful, satisfying container gardening experience:
  • Choose the right container - Use containers with capacities between 15 and 120 quarts, remembering that small pots restrict the root area and dry out very quickly. Deep rooted vegetables and larger plants require deeper pots to sustain growth.
  • Choose the right soil and fertilizer - There are a variety of potting soil mixes specially balanced for the types of plants most often used in a container garden. Since many of these are slightly acidic, it’s often helpful to add a little lime to the soil.
  • Choose the right plant and location - Properly prepared with the right container, soil, and fertilizer, the next important decision is what to plant. The final choice comes down to personal preference and the type of atmosphere you want to create. Petunias, impatiens, periwinkles and geraniums do especially well in containers and add dramatic color to any area.

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